What do you do if you get sick in Cambodia

Cross-border treatment

The Cambodian healthcare system, while reasonably inexpensive in the majority of cases, is questionable in terms of standard of care and accessibility. The latter is particularly true when considering specialised procedures which will be either unavailable in the country or prohibitively expensive.

What do you do if you get sick in Cambodia

The healthcare infrastructure of Cambodia is yet to fully recover following years of civil unrest, leaving the Southeast Asian country trailing in their neighbours' wake in terms of life expectancy and quality of care.

For expats and locals the thought of falling ill or having an accident in Cambodia is not particularly pleasant then, and we have long warned expats just how important a health plan including medical evacuation is. Uninsured, the cost of getting to Vietnam or Thailand for emergency care can be as high as US$15,000.  

Medical tourism

The same goes for non-emergency treatment, as there are significantly better healthcare systems a stone’s throw away from Cambodia, where you’ll likely feel much more comfortable and assured. Within the next decade the medical tourism industry, already valued at US$439 billion, is expected to grow by 25% year on year.  Global health insurers have taken note and are finding ways to adapt and incorporate the trend into their plans, with cross-border treatment having become the latest catchphrase.

For expats living in Cambodia this means a luxury of choice is now available through health insurance plans, with cover from Principle Assurance  going as far as to allow you to be treated in any country in the world (barring the U.S.). You now have the ability to seek care in the countries that offer the best treatment for particular, specialised procedures.

Singapore, not far south of Cambodia, has one of the best health infrastructures in the world with specialised centres for cancer, dermatology and cardiac treatment. 

And if you're not bed-bound, you can always use your medical visit as an excuse to explore new regions around you. 

The healthcare infrastructure of Cambodia is yet to fully recover following years of civil unrest, leaving the Southeast Asian country trailing in their neighbours' wake in terms of life expectancy and quality of care.

For expats and locals the thought of falling ill or having an accident in Cambodia is not particularly pleasant then, and we have long warned expats just how important a health plan including medical evacuation is. Uninsured, the cost of getting to Vietnam or Thailand for emergency care can be as high as US$15,000.  

Medical tourism

The same goes for non-emergency treatment, as there are significantly better healthcare systems a stone’s throw away from Cambodia, where you’ll likely feel much more comfortable and assured. Within the next decade the medical tourism industry, already valued at US$439 billion, is expected to grow by 25% year on year.  Global health insurers have taken note and are finding ways to adapt and incorporate the trend into their plans, with cross-border treatment having become the latest catchphrase.

For expats living in Cambodia this means a luxury of choice is now available through health insurance plans, with cover from Principle Assurance  going as far as to allow you to be treated in any country in the world (barring the U.S.). You now have the ability to seek care in the countries that offer the best treatment for particular, specialised procedures.

Singapore, not far south of Cambodia, has one of the best health infrastructures in the world with specialised centres for cancer, dermatology and cardiac treatment. 

And if you're not bed-bound, you can always use your medical visit as an excuse to explore new regions around you. 

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