Introduction

The Finnish rental market

As property prices keep rising, most Finnish people decide to rent rather than buy. Self-contained studios are particularly popular in cities. Finding a place to live can be rather hard in Helsinki, but elsewhere you shouldn’t have problems.

Introduction

High-quality housing

Renting a flat in Finland is rather easy and the quality of housing is generally high. The accommodation is generally very well insulated and central heating is fitted in most apartments to protect tenants from the cold climate in winter.

The majority of rental accommodation is owned by private landlords or housing investment companies. Studios and one-bedroom apartments in blocks are very common in the cities, while in rural areas and smaller towns terraced, semi-attached and private houses are more popular.

The other kind of rental accommodation is housing subsidised by the state. However, this option is very scarcely available to expatriates and generally involves joining a horrendously long waiting list.

Most of the housing is rented unfurnished so you need to buy or bring your own furniture. Nowadays, Finns tend to travel a lot so furnished short-term options can be available.

Finding a place

House hunting can be difficult if you don’t speak any English as most housing ads are in Finnish. If you are coming to work in Finland, it is definitely worth checking with your employer to see if they can help you find accommodation, at least on a temporary basis.

Join Facebook groups and check out the Finnish Tenants Organisation . You can also try real estate agents, but they often charge a fee.

High-quality housing

Renting a flat in Finland is rather easy and the quality of housing is generally high. The accommodation is generally very well insulated and central heating is fitted in most apartments to protect tenants from the cold climate in winter.

The majority of rental accommodation is owned by private landlords or housing investment companies. Studios and one-bedroom apartments in blocks are very common in the cities, while in rural areas and smaller towns terraced, semi-attached and private houses are more popular.

The other kind of rental accommodation is housing subsidised by the state. However, this option is very scarcely available to expatriates and generally involves joining a horrendously long waiting list.

Most of the housing is rented unfurnished so you need to buy or bring your own furniture. Nowadays, Finns tend to travel a lot so furnished short-term options can be available.

Finding a place

House hunting can be difficult if you don’t speak any English as most housing ads are in Finnish. If you are coming to work in Finland, it is definitely worth checking with your employer to see if they can help you find accommodation, at least on a temporary basis.

Join Facebook groups and check out the Finnish Tenants Organisation . You can also try real estate agents, but they often charge a fee.

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