Foreigners in Business

Limitations on foreigners in Ireland

Foreigners from outside of the European Economic Area looking to establish a business in Ireland must (subject to certain exceptions, including those with refugee status, dependent relatives of EEA nationals allowed to reside in Ireland, and those who are allowed to remain in the country as the spouse of an Irish national, the parent of an Irish citizen, or those granted leave to remain on humanitarian grounds) obtain permission from the Minister for Justice, Equality & Law Reform.

Foreigners in Business

Requests should be sent to:

Business Permission Unit,
Immigration Services Section,
Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service,
1st Floor, 13-14 Burgh Quay,
Dublin 2.

If permission is granted, a Business Permission Visa must be applied for, which will require a completed and signed application form, a passport valid for at least a year, the aforementioned business permission letter, a registration certificate (if the individual in question is already resident in Ireland), a statement of character from the police authorities in previous countries of residence, a business plan, supporting evidence for skills and qualifications, supporting evidence of available investment capital (see below), references (with the exception, in the latter two instances, of writers, artists and crafts-people, who must be able to show that they are internationally known in their field, and able to fully support themselves) and details of the proposed location of the business.

Non-EEA nationals

Non-EEA nationals must show that their business will create or maintain employment (for a minimum of 2 EEA nationals), and demonstrate their intention and ability to make a personal investment of at least EUR300,000. The business in question must also be commercially viable, add to the “commercial activity and competitiveness of the state”, and must allow the individual in question to support him/herself and any dependants without the need for social assistance.

Business Permission Visa applications should be sent to:

Business Permission Unit, Immigration Services Section,
Irish Naturalisation & Immigration Service
Department of Justice, Equality & Law Reform
First Floor
13-14 Burgh Quay,
Dublin 2.

In terms of EU and EEA residents establishing a business in Ireland, the requirements are broadly the same as for Irish citizens.

This article is an extract from Personal Business Tax Guide , dated 4th January 2011, for the latest version please click here .

Requests should be sent to:

Business Permission Unit,
Immigration Services Section,
Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service,
1st Floor, 13-14 Burgh Quay,
Dublin 2.

If permission is granted, a Business Permission Visa must be applied for, which will require a completed and signed application form, a passport valid for at least a year, the aforementioned business permission letter, a registration certificate (if the individual in question is already resident in Ireland), a statement of character from the police authorities in previous countries of residence, a business plan, supporting evidence for skills and qualifications, supporting evidence of available investment capital (see below), references (with the exception, in the latter two instances, of writers, artists and crafts-people, who must be able to show that they are internationally known in their field, and able to fully support themselves) and details of the proposed location of the business.

Non-EEA nationals

Non-EEA nationals must show that their business will create or maintain employment (for a minimum of 2 EEA nationals), and demonstrate their intention and ability to make a personal investment of at least EUR300,000. The business in question must also be commercially viable, add to the “commercial activity and competitiveness of the state”, and must allow the individual in question to support him/herself and any dependants without the need for social assistance.

Business Permission Visa applications should be sent to:

Business Permission Unit, Immigration Services Section,
Irish Naturalisation & Immigration Service
Department of Justice, Equality & Law Reform
First Floor
13-14 Burgh Quay,
Dublin 2.

In terms of EU and EEA residents establishing a business in Ireland, the requirements are broadly the same as for Irish citizens.

This article is an extract from Personal Business Tax Guide , dated 4th January 2011, for the latest version please click here .

Further reading

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