A Shipping List

Making sure you won't forget

No matter how well you plan, there will probably be something you wish you'd shipped, and something you wish you hadn't - don't be too hard on yourself

A Shipping List

We've compiled a list of the things that we particularly wondered about bringing with us, which we hope you find useful.

Think twice about bringing:

  • wardrobes (most houses have built-in wardrobes)
  • ovens (most houses come with one, and gas is not universally available.)

  • white goods (for washing machines especially, be sure that your brand is available in New Zealand - you may find it difficult to get it serviced otherwise)

  • TVs - NZ TVs work on different frequencies to UK TVs. You may not be able to get all channels, or may be able to get picture but not sound. You may be able to remedy this if you tune it through a NZ video player, or if you have Sky TV. If your TV is multi-standard compatible, you will be able to pick up NZ TV audio by changing from PAL I to PAL B/G somewhere deep in the menus. Check your manual if you think this may apply, and contact the manufacturer to check whether you could get your TV converted for use in New Zealand. Our general advice would be to bring your TV and see how it goes. You do not need to buy a TV licence in New Zealand.
     
  • DVD players - if your DVD player is multiregion capable, or you can find a hack on the internet to make it multiregion capable (like here ), then bring it - otherwise, be aware that NZ dvds are region 4, UK dvds are region 2. NZ DVD players start at $69, and they are predominantly multiregion capable.

  • Scuba diving tanks - NZ regulations require burst valves, and it can be expensive to upgrade. You will not be able to get non-compliant tanks filled. To check whether your tanks are compliant, contact a NZ dive shop.

Definitely bring:

(not because you can't get them in NZ - there are just no compatibility issues)

  • your home phone, including DECT phones
  • your mobile phone if you can get it unlocked

  • power boards (great for you computer, stereo, TV and kitchen - not as many plugs to change!)

  • small appliances

  • computers, including laptops (back up your data thoroughly before you leave, then just change your regional settings and set up a new ISP when you arrive)

  • stereos

Family pets

Leaving your pet behind will be a hard decision to make - it is such a personal decision, that we did not think it belonged in either the do or don't list!

We've compiled a list of the things that we particularly wondered about bringing with us, which we hope you find useful.

Think twice about bringing:

  • wardrobes (most houses have built-in wardrobes)
  • ovens (most houses come with one, and gas is not universally available.)

  • white goods (for washing machines especially, be sure that your brand is available in New Zealand - you may find it difficult to get it serviced otherwise)

  • TVs - NZ TVs work on different frequencies to UK TVs. You may not be able to get all channels, or may be able to get picture but not sound. You may be able to remedy this if you tune it through a NZ video player, or if you have Sky TV. If your TV is multi-standard compatible, you will be able to pick up NZ TV audio by changing from PAL I to PAL B/G somewhere deep in the menus. Check your manual if you think this may apply, and contact the manufacturer to check whether you could get your TV converted for use in New Zealand. Our general advice would be to bring your TV and see how it goes. You do not need to buy a TV licence in New Zealand.
     
  • DVD players - if your DVD player is multiregion capable, or you can find a hack on the internet to make it multiregion capable (like here ), then bring it - otherwise, be aware that NZ dvds are region 4, UK dvds are region 2. NZ DVD players start at $69, and they are predominantly multiregion capable.

  • Scuba diving tanks - NZ regulations require burst valves, and it can be expensive to upgrade. You will not be able to get non-compliant tanks filled. To check whether your tanks are compliant, contact a NZ dive shop.

Definitely bring:

(not because you can't get them in NZ - there are just no compatibility issues)

  • your home phone, including DECT phones
  • your mobile phone if you can get it unlocked

  • power boards (great for you computer, stereo, TV and kitchen - not as many plugs to change!)

  • small appliances

  • computers, including laptops (back up your data thoroughly before you leave, then just change your regional settings and set up a new ISP when you arrive)

  • stereos

Family pets

Leaving your pet behind will be a hard decision to make - it is such a personal decision, that we did not think it belonged in either the do or don't list!

This article was contributed by Jeremy Henderson from Broadbase International. Their UK website, www.broadbaseimmigration.co.uk, has a great range of up-to-date articles on life in New Zealand written especially for prospective migrants.

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