Finding somewhere to live in South Korea

Where to look

Check out this article if you don’t know where to start your search for an apartment or house in South Korea. Get useful tips here on where to look for accommodation and how to deal with landlords.

Finding somewhere to live in South Korea

Online

The easiest way to search for housing is through the Internet. Online search engines can provide quality resources such as real estate websites and listings of property from an online newspaper. Other helpful websites like expat exchange websites or international sublease sites can also prove useful.

Offline

If you are looking for resources offline, your best bet would be local English newspapers. They are packed with listings of property for rent or sale. However, most of the properties are submitted by the actual owners themselves who, for the most part, do not speak English. Therefore, if your Korean is weak, you can either find specific ads posted by realtors, have a friend or translator assist you in dealing directly with an owner, or find a local letting agency or real estate office which also handles rental accommodation..

Viewing appointments

It is always recommended to check out a residence before agreeing to anything. Even if you see pictures and receive all the information you may think you need, you do not want to be surprised on move-in day.

Appointments can be made online, over the phone, or in person with realtors or property owners. Bring a friend or hire a translator to accompany you (if the real estate agent does not already provide one), so you can fully understand the details of the property and contract.

Tips for dealing with your landlord

Chances are your landlord has already dealt with foreigners if a real estate agent refers you to that property. Normally, foreign tenants have no problem respecting the property and surrounding neighbors. Adapting to the heating and fan system or learning how to turn on hot water may be difficult to get used to, but landlords are generally helpful with such problems. They may assume that as a foreigner, you are well off, which puts you in danger of being ripped-off. If you sense there is a problem, speak to your real estate agent first before jumping to conclusions.

Online

The easiest way to search for housing is through the Internet. Online search engines can provide quality resources such as real estate websites and listings of property from an online newspaper. Other helpful websites like expat exchange websites or international sublease sites can also prove useful.

Offline

If you are looking for resources offline, your best bet would be local English newspapers. They are packed with listings of property for rent or sale. However, most of the properties are submitted by the actual owners themselves who, for the most part, do not speak English. Therefore, if your Korean is weak, you can either find specific ads posted by realtors, have a friend or translator assist you in dealing directly with an owner, or find a local letting agency or real estate office which also handles rental accommodation..

Viewing appointments

It is always recommended to check out a residence before agreeing to anything. Even if you see pictures and receive all the information you may think you need, you do not want to be surprised on move-in day.

Appointments can be made online, over the phone, or in person with realtors or property owners. Bring a friend or hire a translator to accompany you (if the real estate agent does not already provide one), so you can fully understand the details of the property and contract.

Tips for dealing with your landlord

Chances are your landlord has already dealt with foreigners if a real estate agent refers you to that property. Normally, foreign tenants have no problem respecting the property and surrounding neighbors. Adapting to the heating and fan system or learning how to turn on hot water may be difficult to get used to, but landlords are generally helpful with such problems. They may assume that as a foreigner, you are well off, which puts you in danger of being ripped-off. If you sense there is a problem, speak to your real estate agent first before jumping to conclusions.

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