Moving in

Household management, utilities & disputes

When you move into your new house you often have to take care of a lot of things that might work differently in Argentina than in your home country.

Moving in

This section deals with the most common issues you will be faced with. Look at the forum for more tips on how to make your household management easier.

If you want to have an idea of the utility expenses of a place, ask to see previous bills before renting or buying a place. Important: If it is possible to pay your bills electronically in Argentina do so! Paying any bill in Argentina is an adventure that can easily exceed your worst expectations.

Utilities

Depending on the landlord, utility expenses and community fees may or may not be included in the rent. Community fees usually cover the costs of general maintenance and sometimes one or more of the utilities. Be sure to ask which items you will have to pay for yourself and which are included. Gas, electricity and water bills all add up and can end up being a large expense. Not all areas in Argentina have water or even electricity meters. In those cases a fixed monthly amount is charged.

Deposit

Law states that a security deposit may not exceed the equivalent of one month’s rent for every year of the contract.

Disputes in Real Estate

Disputes can arise in any given real estate relation. You could have trouble with your landlord, the seller, buyer or your tenants. In Argentina rights in real estate property are based on Roman Law. The national constitution guarantees the ownership right and ownership is ruled by the Civil Code. Argentineans and foreigners are treated the same way.

Besides going to court to solve problems there is also the option to go the Tribunal Arbitral para Asuntos Inmobiliaria (Real Estate Tribunal). The decisions of the Tribunal are binding and the process of starting up a procedure with the Tribunal is often more economic and easier than going to Court. However, in order to make use of the Tribunal both parties had to agree in their real estate contract that disputes will be solved in front of the Real Estate Tribunal.

This section deals with the most common issues you will be faced with. Look at the forum for more tips on how to make your household management easier.

If you want to have an idea of the utility expenses of a place, ask to see previous bills before renting or buying a place. Important: If it is possible to pay your bills electronically in Argentina do so! Paying any bill in Argentina is an adventure that can easily exceed your worst expectations.

Utilities

Depending on the landlord, utility expenses and community fees may or may not be included in the rent. Community fees usually cover the costs of general maintenance and sometimes one or more of the utilities. Be sure to ask which items you will have to pay for yourself and which are included. Gas, electricity and water bills all add up and can end up being a large expense. Not all areas in Argentina have water or even electricity meters. In those cases a fixed monthly amount is charged.

Deposit

Law states that a security deposit may not exceed the equivalent of one month’s rent for every year of the contract.

Disputes in Real Estate

Disputes can arise in any given real estate relation. You could have trouble with your landlord, the seller, buyer or your tenants. In Argentina rights in real estate property are based on Roman Law. The national constitution guarantees the ownership right and ownership is ruled by the Civil Code. Argentineans and foreigners are treated the same way.

Besides going to court to solve problems there is also the option to go the Tribunal Arbitral para Asuntos Inmobiliaria (Real Estate Tribunal). The decisions of the Tribunal are binding and the process of starting up a procedure with the Tribunal is often more economic and easier than going to Court. However, in order to make use of the Tribunal both parties had to agree in their real estate contract that disputes will be solved in front of the Real Estate Tribunal.

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