Finding employment in the Netherlands

How to find a job and where to look

English is the working language of many commercial organisations in the Netherlands. For most international and multi-national companies it is more important to be able to speak fluent English than to speak Dutch.

Finding employment in the Netherlands

For native speakers of English and other languages who are seeking low-skilled work, there are many employment opportunities. Especially in the many international call centres located in the main cities of the Netherlands.

Where to look for a job in the Netherlands

There are various ways to find a job in the Netherlands. Checking Internet job-sites such as www.togetherabroad.nl ; applying directly to employers, or using employment or recruitment agencies. However, over 60% of all job vacancies are reportedly filled by informal methods. So a good network of contacts in the Netherlands might be your most valuable source of information on jobs in your area of expertise. You can also join business networking associations such as www.network-club.com , a web-based English-speaking club which holds regular meetings throughout the Netherlands.

There are also many online job sites advertising vacancies in the Netherlands, and many of these allow jobseekers to post their own CVs for perusal by prospective employers. Useful online sources of information on jobs in Holland include EURES, the European employment services website for jobseekers and employers throughout Europe. The website of the Centre for Work and Income (CWI) at www.werk.nl , Holland's public employment services, and the websites of private employment agencies. In the Netherlands, employment agencies generally deal with vacancies for non-specialized areas of work, while recruitment agencies assist people with various types of specialist or senior level jobs. A word of warning on the use of agencies: any legal job in the Netherlands requires a work permit, whether it is obtained through an employer or through the CWI. Without a work permit hiring a foreign national is illegal. Another stumbling block may be that most jobs advertised through agencies require some level of Dutch.

It is also very common for jobseekers in the Netherlands to approach companies directly to enquire about employment opportunities or to apply for vacancies advertised on their websites.

Around 4% of all employees in the Netherlands work via recruitment agencies which post them to other organisations on a temporary basis. If you are allowed to work in the Netherlands without a work permit you might be able to find temporary work through agencies such as Undutchables, Adams Recruitment, Unique Multilinqual Services, Madison Parker, Randstadt etc .

How to apply for a job in the Netherlands

When applying for jobs in the Netherlands, you should send your Curriculum Vitae (CV), along with a covering letter explaining why you are interested in the post and why you feel that the company should employ you. Unless you are applying to a large multinational organisation, your covering letter should preferably be in Dutch and should be no longer than one page; your CV should be tailored to the post you are applying for, and should ideally not exceed two pages. It should include details of your work experience, followed by your education, arranged in chronological order. Application forms are also sometimes used by larger organisations or for online applications.

For more information about employment in the Netherlands please visit the website www.togetherabroad.nl 

For native speakers of English and other languages who are seeking low-skilled work, there are many employment opportunities. Especially in the many international call centres located in the main cities of the Netherlands.

Where to look for a job in the Netherlands

There are various ways to find a job in the Netherlands. Checking Internet job-sites such as www.togetherabroad.nl ; applying directly to employers, or using employment or recruitment agencies. However, over 60% of all job vacancies are reportedly filled by informal methods. So a good network of contacts in the Netherlands might be your most valuable source of information on jobs in your area of expertise. You can also join business networking associations such as www.network-club.com , a web-based English-speaking club which holds regular meetings throughout the Netherlands.

There are also many online job sites advertising vacancies in the Netherlands, and many of these allow jobseekers to post their own CVs for perusal by prospective employers. Useful online sources of information on jobs in Holland include EURES, the European employment services website for jobseekers and employers throughout Europe. The website of the Centre for Work and Income (CWI) at www.werk.nl , Holland's public employment services, and the websites of private employment agencies. In the Netherlands, employment agencies generally deal with vacancies for non-specialized areas of work, while recruitment agencies assist people with various types of specialist or senior level jobs. A word of warning on the use of agencies: any legal job in the Netherlands requires a work permit, whether it is obtained through an employer or through the CWI. Without a work permit hiring a foreign national is illegal. Another stumbling block may be that most jobs advertised through agencies require some level of Dutch.

It is also very common for jobseekers in the Netherlands to approach companies directly to enquire about employment opportunities or to apply for vacancies advertised on their websites.

Around 4% of all employees in the Netherlands work via recruitment agencies which post them to other organisations on a temporary basis. If you are allowed to work in the Netherlands without a work permit you might be able to find temporary work through agencies such as Undutchables, Adams Recruitment, Unique Multilinqual Services, Madison Parker, Randstadt etc .

How to apply for a job in the Netherlands

When applying for jobs in the Netherlands, you should send your Curriculum Vitae (CV), along with a covering letter explaining why you are interested in the post and why you feel that the company should employ you. Unless you are applying to a large multinational organisation, your covering letter should preferably be in Dutch and should be no longer than one page; your CV should be tailored to the post you are applying for, and should ideally not exceed two pages. It should include details of your work experience, followed by your education, arranged in chronological order. Application forms are also sometimes used by larger organisations or for online applications.

For more information about employment in the Netherlands please visit the website www.togetherabroad.nl 

This article has been submitted by Together Abroad

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