Traffic regulations in Bahrain

What expats should know

People in Bahrain tend to sometimes drive in an unpredictable way, however the traffic regulations are very strict and are well enforced in the Kingdom. There are numerous cameras on the roads, and costly fines penalise speeding drivers.     

Traffic regulations in Bahrain

Driving in Bahrain

Driving around Bahrain is not difficult, the road system is very good, and there are signs in both Arabic and English for all the major sites expats would potentially need. Roads are continuously being developed and constructed. Expats coming from countries such as the UK, Australia, or India should note driving in Bahrain is on the right-hand side of the road.

Traffic regulations should be strictly followed: speed limits, drink driving measures and the wearing of seatbelts are firmly enforced. Expat drivers should take extra care whilst driving, as the local driving standards can often be quite low: for instance, speeding, talking on the phone whilst driving and switching lanes without indication should be of no surprise. Young children are only allowed to sit at the back of a car.

Traffic jams tend to be heavy at midday when workers go home, until firms reopen in the afternoon. Normally, Thursday evenings have the most severe traffic jams as many Saudi Arabians travel to Bahrain for the weekend (Friday-Saturday in Bahrain).

There are many petrol stations, especially on highways and are very well signposted. In towns and cities the maximum driving speed is 60 km/h (37 mph), in the suburbs’ outer limits - 80 km/h (50 mph), and on highways - 100 km/h (62 mph).

Having an accident

In case of a car accident, you should always wait for the arrival of the traffic police, as no matter how small the accident is, a report has to be filed. Dial this number 1768 8888 in case of an accident, however if it is a severe accident and emergency services are needed, then dial 999.

If there have been no injuries, then the car can be moved, but if people have been injured you should wait for the accident report to be filed before moving the car. This is important, as if you move the car your insurance might be no longer valid. Accidents tend to cause big traffic jams in Bahrain.  

Driving in Bahrain

Driving around Bahrain is not difficult, the road system is very good, and there are signs in both Arabic and English for all the major sites expats would potentially need. Roads are continuously being developed and constructed. Expats coming from countries such as the UK, Australia, or India should note driving in Bahrain is on the right-hand side of the road.

Traffic regulations should be strictly followed: speed limits, drink driving measures and the wearing of seatbelts are firmly enforced. Expat drivers should take extra care whilst driving, as the local driving standards can often be quite low: for instance, speeding, talking on the phone whilst driving and switching lanes without indication should be of no surprise. Young children are only allowed to sit at the back of a car.

Traffic jams tend to be heavy at midday when workers go home, until firms reopen in the afternoon. Normally, Thursday evenings have the most severe traffic jams as many Saudi Arabians travel to Bahrain for the weekend (Friday-Saturday in Bahrain).

There are many petrol stations, especially on highways and are very well signposted. In towns and cities the maximum driving speed is 60 km/h (37 mph), in the suburbs’ outer limits - 80 km/h (50 mph), and on highways - 100 km/h (62 mph).

Having an accident

In case of a car accident, you should always wait for the arrival of the traffic police, as no matter how small the accident is, a report has to be filed. Dial this number 1768 8888 in case of an accident, however if it is a severe accident and emergency services are needed, then dial 999.

If there have been no injuries, then the car can be moved, but if people have been injured you should wait for the accident report to be filed before moving the car. This is important, as if you move the car your insurance might be no longer valid. Accidents tend to cause big traffic jams in Bahrain.  

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